20 Oct 2010

It can’t all be bagels and cream cheese

5 Comments Family, Personal Crap

Growing up, my Grandma used to have us over frequently for Sunday brunch. It was a long drive from Woodland Hills to Fullerton, but just the thought of the bagels and lox, and blintzes and goodies that Grandma would make was totally worth the drive. She and my Grandpa (these are my dad’s folks) lived in a delightfully cozy little house that was immaculately kept and always smelled like something baking and my grandpa’s cologne. Oh, and pipe tobacco.

We always ate at the dining room table in front of the dry sink with the big, wooden salad bowl on it that now sits in my dining room, beneath a picture my dad painted when he was in his twenties. There was always a ton of laughter at the table and a lot of eating. Grandma always made the best coffee, too. A teaspoon for each cup of water plus one for the pot. I still do that today. My grandpa would sit at the head of the table and cut all of our bagels with a giant, serrated knife. I would watch his hands, tanned from golfing with long fingers and thin knuckles. There was something incredibly deliberate and delicate about the way he cut a bagel. I can see it so vividly now.

Grandma would have everything prepared and get up constantly to make sure we all had what we needed. She’d always make sure our elbows were off the table, our napkins were on our laps, and we weren’t talking with our mouths full. Grandpa would usually tell some brilliantly hilarious story, complete with 9 different accents. He was one of the last great story tellers. After we ate, she’d bring out homemade cookies or rice pudding or chocolate cake. Then we’d all go into the family room where there would be a newspaper opened to the bridge section on the table and a book that someone was in the middle of reading. My parents and grandparents would talk about life and politics and my brother and I would play with their metal tic tac toe set or watch TV, or go into the office and look at Grandpa’s things.

I swear I look back at these times as “Rockwellian”. I feel like you could paint a picture of any of these brunch Sundays and hang it in a store that sells Americana. And it would sell. My grandpa passed away when I was 14 and I was devastated. For weeks I felt like I was walking through fog. The next ten years, my grandma and I became very good friends. As soon as I got my driver’s license, I would drive to Fullerton for lunches or dinners just to hang out and talk. She was still cooking and baking, but we’d eat at the kitchen table now; the dining room saved for only very special occasions. She loved to know everything that was going on with me, with boys, and with friends. We’d shop for clothes together. I still have a skirt I bought the last time I shopped with her. I can’t throw it out. That was 15 or 16 years ago.

After my grandpa passed away, my grandma was still very social, very active. She dressed beautifully and exercised daily. But there was a tiny bit of her that had clearly changed. A part of her that was lost. I wonder what my niece and nephew see in my mom now. Is she different to them? She isn’t to me. She’s just in mourning. Grandma passed away when I was 24. She did it gracefully, just like she lived her life. One day I’ll tell you the story.

Tonight Garrett was walking around using his baseball bat as a cane. He put on a different voice and came into the kitchen saying, “Hello!” I said hi and asked him who he was. “I’m Grandpa! The one with Grandma Joan!” I asked if he meant Grandpa Art. “Yes! Grandpa Art! Do you want to come with me?” I said, “Sure! Where are we going?” “Just to my room”, he said. I bent down and hugged him a little too hard. “I miss you, Grandpa Art”, I said. “It’s good to see you.”

Garrett won’t remember much about his Grandpa. Heck, he only knows him walking with a cane or a walker, and that didn’t happen until the last year or so. I hate that he won’t have a memory of him like I do of my grandfather. I hate that he won’t know what my mom was like when she was around my dad. But I sure as hell hope he knows her until he’s well into his teens. I’m so lucky I was able to know my grandparents as long as I did. I had my mom’s mom around until I was 21, too. She was sweet and beautiful and could cook anything better than I’ll ever be able to. I can’t stand that Garrett won’t have stories about my dad. But I’ll tell him as many as I can, and I hope he can see him in those stories the way I see my grandpa still today. At least he’s thinking about him. And he let me see him for a minute tonight, too. That’s a start.

I’ll tell you what I just realized reading this post back. Garrett will have all of these people in his life forever. The way I make my coffee, and will teach him to make it. The way we laugh at meal time (and ALL the time), the traditions we have that will be passed down. The storytelling and the discipline. The foods that we love, the games that we play. All of this is a part of me because of Them. And all of it will be a part of Garrett. That is a very comforting thought. As comforting as a bagel with cream cheese on a Sunday morning in Fullerton.

04 Oct 2010

Pumpkin Bread MADNESS

6 Comments Cooking/Baking


I was so excited at the store the other day when I saw, for the first time in months… Pumpkin Puree’!!! I love making and eating pumpkin bread so much, I think it’s my favorite thing about Fall. Plus, Garrett loves it and it’s a hit with my friends. (I’m insecure, so if I do ANYTHING my friends like, it makes me feel good about myself. For a minute. No longer.) Anyhoo, I’ve been using the same recipe for a couple of years (printed out on a piece of paper), and I really wanted to post it here but I can’t find it online again! So I’m going to type it up for you here, with my additions. Let me know how it works out!!

1 1/2 cups flour
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1 cup sugar
1 cup pumpkin puree’ (Remember to use puree’, NOT pumpkin pie filling!!)
1/2 cup canola oil
2 eggs, beaten (or 1/3 cup liquid egg whites)
1/4 cup water (This ingredient is SO important)

My additions:
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1 mashed banana
1 tbsp flax meal

Preheat oven to 350.
Sift together flour, salt, and baking soda, and spices.
In a separate bowl, combine oil and sugar. Add water, eggs, vanilla, flax meal and stir.
Slowly add dry ingredients and mix until combined well. I use a beater on medium. You don’t want to over-mix.

Pour into well-greased 9x5x3 inch loaf pan. Bake 50-60 minutes until toothpick comes out clean. Let cool on rack before taking out of pan.

Some tips:
Always double the recipe and make two breads! One goes so quickly, and this bread freezes well!

Yesterday I had my biggest bread success. My oven runs a tad hot, so the outside of the bread often gets well done and the inside is a little undercooked. SO, I baked at 350 for 46 minutes, then lightly covered with foil and baked four more minutes. Then I turned the oven off and left it four more minutes. I don’t know why… But it worked great!

The above picture is NOT the bread I baked, but it’s a reasonable likeness. I forgot to snap a photo before I cut it up. I suck.

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